Album Review: “Les Paul’s” (The Paul’s) – Night Worker

Album Review of “Les Paul’s” (The Paul’s): Night Worker

"Les Paul's" (The Paul's) - Night Worker

image courtesy of Paul Robert Thomas

“Les Paul’s” (The Paul’s) are Paul Odiase and Paul Robert Thomas. Hence, the clever name. And while I may take issue with their punctuation, their music grew on me steadily over the course of multiple listens.

On The Pauls’ new disc, you can clearly hear the David Bowie influence. Some songs are upfront and overt about it, but you can hear the essence throughout. In the album’s promo material, the songs “This Song,” “On Charles De Gaulle Street,” and “Night Worker” are specifically called out as Bowie tributes. But stylistically, almost the entire disc clearly bears a Bowie-esque flavor.

Night Worker opens with “Say I,” a soft-touch but medium-fast-tempo number whose horns give it a festive nature and whose music video drives home its anti-war/pro-peace lyrics.  It’s one of a few tracks that particularly stand out on this album

“Night Worker” is a good, somewhat progressive, old-style soft rocker, mixing a Bowie-styled soft gravel vocal with a guitar line that softly drifts in and out of the song’s steady rhythm.

Possibly the sneakiest catchy track in the collection is mid-tempo “Peat Bog Soldiers.” Supported by an ’80s-reminiscent heavy synth backdrop, an infectious beat, and an earnestly important vocal delivery, the song’s irregular rhythm belies its earworm quotient.

It’s immediately followed by well-matched, faster-tempo, synth-driven “Six Feet Under,” whose lyrical phrasing and vocal fast-slow tempo are nearly hypnotic.

The album winds down with mellow, late ’70s/early ’80s Bowie-esque “Till My Day is Done,” pop-rock-slightly blues “Those Schizophrenic Blues,” and, finally, faster-tempo “Down, Down, Down,” a tune whose serious delivery is probably the main reason it’s not a full-on dance number.

In all, “Les Paul’s” (The Paul’s) deliver an album that makes some interesting artistic choices, paying tribute to David Bowie and using his ’70s or ’80s sound as an inspiration, jumping off from that starting point to explore surrounding artistic directions. If that sounds interesting to you, you’ll likely find a few tracks on here you’ll quite enjoy and, eventually, sing along with.

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